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Rount 1 Grantee

Innovations in Reentry Round 1 (IIR-1)

The first round of grants was awarded in 2013, through a participatory decision-making process coordinated by Alameda County Public Health Department and the Place Matters team. Nine grantees were awarded $1,551,605 in 18-month grants which ran from November 2013 to April 2015

KEY FINDINGS:

  • The nine IIR-1 projects served 280 pre-release participants and 326 post-release participants – 137 more participants than projects had set out to serve.
  • 430 of participants (71%) were supported by IIR projects over time (more than one contact).
  • 79% of all ongoing, post-release participants were under the supervision of the Alameda County Probation Department.
  • Participants came from all over Alameda County. The majority of participants spent some time living in Oakland. Participants lived within all five supervisorial districts.
  • Only 16 participants (9% of active, ongoing post-release participants) were re-incarcerated – and of these, only six were re-incarcerated for new crimes. Rates of recidivism and revocation for IIR participants were substantially lower than the most comparable rates within Alameda County and California – between 45% and 88% lower than expected. (Recidivism can either refer to people returned to custody for any reason but only for those returned for a new crime, while revocation refers to people returned to custody for a violation of the terms of their release.)
  • Although each grant project used different measures to track their impact on participants, all grantees were successful in improving the well-being of their participants. Multiple grant projects demonstrated a positive effect related to participants’ self-confidence, employment status, educational attainment, and utilization of available and necessary services.

For more information, please see the Executive Summary or the full November 2013 – April 2015 Funding Period Evaluation Report.

Innovations in Reentry Round 1 Continuation (IIR-1C)

In 2016, seven of the Round 1 grantees were awarded around $450,000 in 6-month Continuation Grants to utilize their original project findings to develop final organizational assets and tools. These project deliverables were developed with the intention of system learning, and may be adopted by other service providers.

IIR-1 and IIR-1C Grantees

Asian Prisoner Support Committee (APSC)

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Funding Amount: $25,000 (IIR-1) | $10,000 (IIR-1C)

Applicant Category: Individual/Informal Group

Project Name: Reducing Recidivism Through Cultural Empowerment (IIR-1, IIR-1C)

Service Location(s): Downtown Oakland/Chinatown, Oakland, San Quentin, Vacaville (Solano State Prison)

Population Served: Southeast Asians, Pacific Islanders, and others in the male reentry community who face unaddressed language and cultural needs in Alameda County.

Learning Question: How might participation in cultural activities and community action promote healing and reduce recidivism for the Southeast Asian and Pacific Islander community?

Project Summary: APSC will implement a multifaceted reentry program in Alameda County that includes culture-based reentry support groups, culturally competent life coaching, and reentry service linkages and referrals.

Resources:

download pdf iconProject Brochure

download pdf iconProgram Model Framework – Roots2Reentry


Website: www.asianprisonersupport.com

Asian Prisoner Support Committee |
Round 1 (2013-2015), Round 1 Phase 2 (2016) Grantee

Birth Justice Project / UCSF Office of Sponsored Research

Birth Justice Project Logo

Round IIR-1

Funding Amount: $191,305

Applicant Category: Single Organization

Project Name: A Pilot Project Designed to Train Previously Incarcerated Women to Become Birth Doulas

Service Location(s): Highland Hospital and Santa Rita Jail (Dublin)

Population Served: Incarcerated pregnant women (for doula care), incarcerated women (for women's health empowerment groups), and formerly-incarcerated women (for doula training program).

Learning Question: Does job training and social support for reentry clients help to create/maintain or strengthen positive relationships for previously incarcerated women and reduce recidivism?

Project Summary: In collaboration with UCSF, the program will expand the current Birth Justice Project services provided in San Francisco to Alameda County, namely to:

  • Develop a vocational doula training program,
  • Provide women's health empowerment groups for incarcerated women, and
  • Provide birth doula care and breastfeeding support for pregnant inmates.

Round IIR-1C

Funding Amount: $45,023

Applicant Category: Single Organization

Project Name: Roots of Labor Birth Collective (RLBC) formerly The Community Doula Project

Service Location(s): Highland Hospital and Santa Rita Jail (Dublin)

Population Served: Participating doulas ranging in age from 22 years to 52 years with a mean age of 32 years old. All participants identify as people of color or people from indigenous backgrounds.

Learning Question: Does job training and social support for reentry clients help to create/maintain or strengthen positive relationships for previously incarcerated women and reduce recidivism?

Project Summary: Roots of Labor Birth Collective is committed to supporting, empowering and caring for birthing members of our community. RLBC consists of doulas of color. We strive to reflect the communities we serve while uplifting and caring for ourselves.

Resources:

download pdf iconProject Brochure

download pdf iconProject Report – Roots labor Birth Collective

download pdf iconAlameda County Behavioral Health Care Services RLBC Report


Website: www.birthjusticeproject.org

Birth Justice Project / UCSF Office of Sponsored Research |
Round 1 (2013-2015), Round 1 Phase 2 (2016) Grantee

Centerforce

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Funding Amount: $200,000 (IIR-1) | $49,931 (IIR-1C)

Applicant Category: Single Organization

Project Name: The ACT Program (IIR-1, IIR-1C)

Service Location(s): Centerforce’s office, Santa Rita Jail (Dublin), San Quentin State Prison

Population Served: People who are incarcerated who are either infected with the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) or at risk of infection, especially those who have served 5 years or less and are between the ages of 18-35.

Learning Question: Does intensive case management for formerly and currently incarcerated individuals reentering Alameda County from Santa Rita Jail (SRJ) and San Quentin State Prison (SQSP) who are at risk for, and infected with, hepatitis C virus (HCV) increase their linkage to HCV care and needed transitional services and subsequently decrease their risk of recidivism?

Project Summary: An individual-level intervention for people transitioning from prison which includes risk-reduction, counseling, testing, and appropriate medical management of persons infected with or at at-risk for acquiring the Hepatitis C virus (HCV).

Resources:

download pdf iconProject Brochure

download pdf iconACT Training Curriculum


Website: www.centerforce.org

Centerforce |
Round 1 (2013-2015), Round 1 Phase 2 (2016) Grantee

Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights (LCCR) / National Employment Law Project (NELP)

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Round IIR-1

Funding Amount: $389,336

Applicant Category: Collaborative

Collaborative Partner: National Employment Law Project

Project Name: Cultivating Fair Chance Employment in Alameda County

Service Location: Alameda County, primarily sites in Oakland

Population Served: Small businesses and formerly incarcerated individuals facing barriers to employment

Learning Question: How can we engage the business community, and particularly the small business community, in efforts to expand economic opportunity for formerly incarcerated people?

Project Summary: A multi-pronged approach to expand employment opportunities for formerly incarcerated people via:

  • Directly engaging the business community, and small businesses in particular, to build support for recidivism reduction through an employer event series, employer training, and other outreach,
  • An education campaign targeted at the general public,
  • Trainings and workshops for job seekers and workforce development professionals.

Round IIR-1C

Funding Amount: $3116,144

Applicant Category: Collaborative

Collaborative Partner: National Employment Law Project

Project Name: Model Policies for Reentry Hiring in Alameda County Behavioral Health Care Services

Service Location: Alameda County, primarily sites in Oakland

Population Served: People with prior convictions who are unemployed or underemployed and facing persistent employment barriers due to their records.

Learning Question: How can we expand economic opportunity within the public sector of Alameda for formerly incarcerated people and people facing barriers due to their records using the lessons learned and models across the nation that have successfully achieved statewide and local employment reforms promoting reentry?

Project Summary: LCCR and NELP will develop a model reentry hiring policy for Alameda County, with a particular focus on healthrelated agencies.

Resources:

download pdf iconProject Brochure

download pdf iconProject Report – Fair Hiring Strategy


Website: www.lccr.com

Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights (LCCR) / National Employment Law Project (NELP) |
Round 1 (2013-2015), Round 1 Phase 2 (2016) Grantee

Planting Justice

P2R logo

Funding Amount: $200,000 (IIR-1)

Applicant Category: Single Organization

Project Name: Pathways to Resilience (P2R)

Collaborative Partners: Green Life, EarthSeed Consulting, HUB Oakland, Sustainable Economies Law Center, Christopher Shein, Merritt College

Service Location(s):

  • San Quentin and other prisons and jails in Alameda County
  • Merritt College (Permaculture Design Certification Course)
  • HUB Oakland (Broadway, Uptown Oakland-Entrepreneurship Training)
  • United Roots (Telegraph Ave, West Oakland- Green Life component)
  • Home Visits (County-wide- Case Management)
  • Offices and service locations of various referral partners (County-wide)

Population Served: Currently incarcerated individuals (see service locations above) and high risk formerly incarcerated individuals.

Learning Question: Could integrating culturally relevant, experiential permaculture design education with job/entrepreneurship training and wrap-around services reduce recidivism by healing and restoring participants’ connections to the community and the environment?

Project Summary: The project seeks to:

  • Immerse participants in the principles of permaculture,
  • Foster positive relationship skills and empathy
  • Build a supportive community of peers and mentors,
  • Provide hard skills through vocational certification and new employment credentials,
  • Teach reentry-relevant job readiness and entrepreneurship skills,
  • Provide paid work experience and job placement support, and
  • Provide case management and connections to housing, mental health, substance abuse, financial education and legal services.

Website: www.plantingjustice.org

Planting Justice |
Round 1 (2013-2015) Grantee

PUEBLO

pueblo

Funding Amount: $197,570 (IIR-1)

Applicant Category: Single Organization

Project Name: BIO (Balancing Inner and Outer)

Service Location(s): Santa Rita (Dublin), San Quentin State Prison, Oakland

Population Served: Black and Latino males ages 19- 30 (and their families)

Learning Question: Can an integrated, holistic approach which combines skills training, enterprise development, and mentorship, while addressing trauma, help released individuals repair harm they have caused and establish productive relationships with their community?

Project Summary: The project’s design includes:

  • Pre-release restorative justice family integration circles,
  • Full case management,
  • Legal Assistance,
  • Peer mentorship,
  • Enrollment in job training/employment,
  • Educational assessment/support, and
  • Soft-skills workshops.

Website: peopleunited.org

PUEBLO |
Round 1 (2013-2015) Grantee

The Gamble Institute

gamble

Funding Amount: $130,118 (IIR-1) | $20,000 (IIR-1C)

Applicant Category: Single Organization

Project Name: Street Scholars Peer Mentoring Program(IIR-1, IIR-1C)

Service Location(s): Merritt College (Oakland)

Population Served: Formerly incarcerated men and women enrolled in Merritt College who are actively on probation or parole.

Learning Question: How does peer mentoring and college-level education affect the reentry process and rates of recidivism for formerly incarcerated adults?

Project Summary: The Street Scholars peer-mentoring program will provide peer mentoring services to 25 formerly incarcerated students at Merritt College, and conduct a mixed-methods research evaluation of the program during the 2013-2014 academic year.

Resources:

download pdf iconProject Brochure

download pdf iconProject Report – Street Scholars Peer Mentoring Program


Website: www.gambleinstitute.org

The Gamble Institute |
Round 1 (2013-2015), Round 1 Phase 2 (2016) Grantee

The Mentoring Center

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Funding Amount: $200,000 (IIR-1) | $25,500 (IIR-1C)

Applicant Category: Single Organization

Project Name: The Transformative Leadership Institute (IIR-1, IIR-1C)

Service Location(s): District 5, Oakland

Population Served: 18-25 year old males at high risk of recidivism

Learning Question: Can a culturally-appropriate, trauma-informed, inter-generational transformative leadership and mentoring project reduce recidivism?

Project Summary: The Transformative Leadership Institute is an inter-generational, gender-specific, culturally-responsive leadership development program.  The TLI consists of weekly mentoring and leadership development groups and will run in three, four-month cycles, with 25 participants for each cycle.

Resources:

download pdf iconProject Brochure

download pdf iconInnovations in Reentry Service Methodology Manual

download pdf iconInnovations in Reentry: Anger Management and the Transformative Fatherhood and Parenting Project


Website: www.mentor.org

The Mentoring Center |
Round 1 (2013-2015), Round 1 Phase 2 (2016) Grantee

Youth Uprising

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Round IIR-1

Funding Amount: $350,000

Applicant Category: Collaborative

Collaborative Partner: East Bay Community Law Center

Project Name: YU Advance

Service Location(s): Camp Sweeney and East Oakland

Population Served: Young adults referred from Alameda County Probation Department Adult Field Services or receiving mental health services through the Behavioral Health Care Services’ Transitional Age Youth (TAY) System of Care.

Learning Question: Can a comprehensive menu of supportive re-entry and post release services, systems collaboration and advocacy interrupt the progression of transitional age youth (TAY) becoming adult offenders and re-offenders, and essentially reduce the rate of adult recidivism?

Project Summary: YU Advance provides:

  • Discharge planning, cognitive behavioral intervention, and other pre-release services for young adults in custody,
  • Clinical case management and therapeutic services in 1:1 and group settings,
  • Co-case management with the Probation Department for those released under community supervision,
  • Legal services that include expungement, legal advocacy, and legal counseling,
  • Leadership development opportunities that include civic engagement and service learning, and integrated restorative justice principles.

Round IIR-1C

Funding Amount: $350,000

Applicant Category: Collaborative

Collaborative Partner: East Bay Community Law Center

Project Name: TAY Service Delivery Evaluation Video Project

Service Location(s): Camp Sweeney and East Oakland

Population Served: Youth and young adults ages 18-24 years old.

Learning Question: Can a comprehensive menu of supportive re-entry and post release services, systems collaboration and advocacy interrupt the progression of transitional age youth (TAY) becoming adult offenders and re-offenders, and essentially reduce the rate of adult recidivism?

Project Summary: The video project contributes to the best practices from a consumer perspective. It consists of interviews and digital story telling around TAY’s experience with service referral and engagement and highlight effective practices and barriers to service engagement. The goal is to close the identified service gaps.

Resources:

download pdf iconProject Brochure

download pdf iconProject Report – Youth Advance Video Project Innovations in Reentry


Website: www.youthuprising.org

Youth Uprising |
Round 1 (2013-2015), Round 1 Phase 2 (2016) Grantee